Changing the Start date of the Month

BudgetGuy812BudgetGuy812 Posts: 4Member
edited April 2013 in Desktop
Hello,

I recently DLed YNAB and am really liking it. However, I need to change the start date for the month. I get paid on the 15th of each month. I would like to change February to mean Feb 15th - March 15th. It keeps my budgets in line with reality. Please add this feature! This is a deal breaker for me :( Thanks!!!!
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  • WateryTartWateryTart Posts: 1,234Member
    You can still use YNAB - plenty of people here don't get paid on the first of the month. On the 15th when you get your pay, enter it and then budget everything you need to budget until you get paid again. It doesn't matter if it's in one month or the other. Just reflect reality in your budget. You could split your income, if that would help, assigning some of it to this month and some to next month. This really isn't a deal breaker - you kind of need to wrap your head around it, though.
    Joel
  • RandomHandleRandomHandle Posts: 599Member, Beta Tester
    I agree with WateryTart.

    I'll add that once you are operating with a full buffer (having all funds for the current month available to budget on day one) it really doesn't matter when you are paid.

    BudgetGuy, it seems like you are starting with at least a half-buffer in place. Do you have other funds that you can use to get through the 15th-31st of March so you can apply the March 15th paycheck to April?
    Joel
  • BudgetGuy812BudgetGuy812 Posts: 4Member
    I just think it would be more convenient to be able to change the date. Is that too much to ask? It doesn't make sense if your payday is different than the 1st. For example, I budget $50 for February 15th - March 15th, but any outflows after Feb 28th go count for the month of March and not Feb like I would prefer.. My budgets have to be divided weirdly and it makes it more difficult to see if I'm on track or not. I don't know if that makes sense.
  • WateryTartWateryTart Posts: 1,234Member
    It's just a calendar, like any other, really. If you spend money after Feb 28, then you've spent it in March. This is reality.
    Joel
  • SunRaven01SunRaven01 Posts: 175Member
    My husband is paid on the 15th and the last business day of the month. YNAB still works fine. Enter your income when you receive it, give every dollar a job, the follow your budget. YNAB doesn't care when you get paid or where you keep the money. YNAB only wants to know what you've told that money to do.

    If you need to see your bills divided up by pay period, then you can re-name your categories and master categories accordingly. Perhaps you set up a master category called "Bills 1st-15th" and then put categories under that that are always due in that period. Another master category will be "Bills 15-31."

    Our master categories are set up as monthly bills, quarterly bills, and yearly bills. Each category under the master categories include the due date as part of the category name.

    (1) Rent $1285
    (5) DirecTV $125

    And so forth.

    Months are months and defined by the calendar, but how you arrange your categories is completely up to you, and you are encouraged in the YNAB educational videos to make them work for you.
    Joeltandiny
  • Turf_HackerTurf_Hacker Posts: 6,399Member, Moderator, YNAB Team, Beta Tester
    A small (but potentially powerful) advantage of sticking with calendar months is simplicity. Today's date automatically tells you which month in the budget should show the expense (or inflow). If your budget month is the 15th to the 14th, for half the month you need to remember to associate transactions with *last* month's budget. In other words, on March 10th you have to remember that a transaction should count against the February budget.
    Joeltandiny
  • BudgetGuy812BudgetGuy812 Posts: 4Member
    I appreciate the replies and words of advice. However, in terms of simplicity having the option to set a budget month based on your payday is easier than doing what others have suggested.I would like to see the outflows based on each payment period and not based on calendar month, and I would like outflows to better match the amount budgeted. It makes things easier to understand and I wouldn't have to go through the trouble of sorting it in my head or yada yada.

    It probably wouldn't take more than a day to program this into YNAB, and I'm guessing I'm probably not alone in wanting this. But if it doesn't end up on ynab, I think I'll just make my own spread sheet.
    kunostories
  • INAB26INAB26 Posts: 1,576Member, Beta Tester
    I appreciate the replies and words of advice. However, in terms of simplicity having the option to set a budget month based on your payday is easier than doing what others have suggested.I would like to see the outflows based on each payment period and not based on calendar month, and I would like outflows to better match the amount budgeted. It makes things easier to understand and I wouldn't have to go through the trouble of sorting it in my head or yada yada.

    It probably wouldn't take more than a day to program this into YNAB, and I'm guessing I'm probably not alone in wanting this. But if it doesn't end up on ynab, I think I'll just make my own spread sheet.

    I get where you're coming from. I started YNAB 3 years ago having used a very fancy spreadsheet budget that I'd carefully customized to run from the 15th to the 15th of each month. I too was skeptical that I would be able to use YNAB. I will say this though...my spreadsheet budget never worked. We kept overspending and never got ahead. YNAB does. Follow the 4 rules and try to be open to thinking about some things a little differently. I can almost promise that you won't regret it.
  • wyattwyatt Posts: 21Member
    I get paid every other week. I realize that creates a different dynamic than on every 15th, but the principle of the buffer works the same regardless. Without a full buffer, I think your transactions would look like this: You add income to your budget on April 15th and budget your categories to zero. The budget categories need to cover your expenses until May 15. You enter your transactions as they occur during April and the budget amounts go down. When May starts, if you have budgeted for your expenses accurately and not overspent during April, you will have money remaining and carried over to May. This is money to live on until your next paycheck on May 15.

    Here's why the buffer makes such a huge difference. The above scenario does require you to think about your budget across multiple months, which I understand might be tricky if you've never thought of it that way before. The buffer simplifies budgeting and lets you focus on one month: the next one. Let's say you have a full buffer. When you are paid on April 15, you won't use any of that money in April. Categorize the paycheck as Income for Next Month. On May 1 you will have your regular monthly income at the top and you can fully budget for May. When you are paid on May 15th, categorize that as Income for Next Month and that full amount will show up as available to budget in June. When June 1 rolls around, you'll have that month fully funded and the cycle continues.

    As I said, I get paid every two weeks and that variability across months would kill me if I had to think about how to budget it and forecast for those expenses that occur in the next month before my next paycheck...way too much juggling of the calendar. Instead I know that whatever I get paid this month I don't have to be concerned with until next month. That money just sits in my account and YNAB helps me make sure it's funding the categories it needs to fund for next month when I need to spend it. It took me quite a while to get to that point of understanding, but there's no way I'd go back to my spreadsheets. I hope that helps, and I hope you can find a way to utilize YNAB that works for you.
    enb
  • blackdiamondblackdiamond Posts: 2,314Member, Beta Tester
    After reading your request I feel better. From reading the topic I thought you wanted to shift the calendar so that months started on a day other than the 1st! Daylight savings is a similar change that someone managed to get through.

    By the way, this was intended to be full of sarcasm, but was my first thought when reading the topic.

    Once you get used to how YNAB works it will be just fine, I promise. Do you have a months worth of savings to use as the buffer? This would make it super easy.
    Joel
  • dustemdustem Posts: 10Member
    My suggestion is to try it for a pay period and see how it works. I had many of the same grievances you had at first, but after experimenting with how to use it in our family budget I've come to really like it. Heck, even my wife is willing to purchase this after our trial period runs out.
    It probably wouldn't take more than a day to program this into YNAB, and I'm guessing I'm probably not alone in wanting this.

    I'm a Java programmer and web development is what I do and I can tell you that if you want this done right, there is no way this will only take a day. The coding itself may not take that long, but you're not taking into account the design process, research by the programmer (what needs to be changed, what effects it has on the rest of the code, etc.), unit testing, QA, and UAT, plus the process of getting it prepared to be sent to the customers. This is not a fast process and in all honesty I don't want a product that doesn't go through the above.
    Joeltandiny
  • YYC27YYC27 Posts: 1,968Member, Beta Tester
    It probably wouldn't take more than a day to program this into YNAB
    Sure. Change the underlying data storage, all the algorythms used in the program, all the reports, all the displays, update the mobile apps, etc., etc. Heck, I could do that on my lunch break. </sarcasm>
    But if it doesn't end up on ynab, I think I'll just make my own spread sheet.
    Honestly .. this really is more of a perceived problem than a deal breaker. I came into YNAB thinking it was nuts that I couldn't break my budget into two week periods, rather than the calendar month system that's built in. But, really, it doesn't matter. Budget your whole paycheque when you receive it on the 15th. The money will stay in your budget categories into next month. You don't need to do anything. You can budget from the 15th to the 14th, easy-peasy.
    Joelspiderknittandiny
  • Don4Don4 Posts: 18Member, Beta Tester
    Here is an idea, that will only take you half a month to get up to speed with, and that's only because you are waiting for the next "shoe", or paycheck, to arrive:

    Your April 15th paycheck arrives,
    split your income 50% "Available for April" and 50% "Available for May".

    When your May 15th paycheck arrives, split it 50% May, 50% June.

    The percentages can of course vary to fit the timing of your payments and normal spending. Mine actually does work out to be 50/50...and I was actually a bit surprised by that....

    Until recently, my paycheck was semi-monthly (15th & EOM), and my lovely wife's was biweekly (usually 2 checks each month, but with 3 checks 2 months of each year.

    I recently changed jobs, and now both are biweekly...but on opposite weeks. My check is a multiple of my lovely wife's, which made it even more interesting.

    Hopefully, what I've suggested above can help you make it work with out too much adjustment. If YNAB someday does make the feature available, great, until then, I think you will find it has advantages over using Excel...and I'm an accountant: I LOVE Excel! But for budgeting, I use YNAB.

    -- Don4

    P.S. After hitting save, a thought occurred to me: in a sense, you are already doing a monthly budget on your spreadsheet that will drop right into YNAB, since the "budget" is simply a bunch of buckets telling your money how it's going to work for you. The budget for your paycheck doesn't change. You are still going to have to pay for the same things, over the same period of time as you did before. All you need is a way to make the timing of your paycheck fit that "month". What I've suggested will make that happen. With or without the YNAB buffer.

    Ok, this time I'm done. :p
    Joelkunostories
  • BidimusBidimus Posts: 62Member
    I appreciate the replies and words of advice. However, in terms of simplicity having the option to set a budget month based on your payday is easier than doing what others have suggested.I would like to see the outflows based on each payment period and not based on calendar month, and I would like outflows to better match the amount budgeted. It makes things easier to understand and I wouldn't have to go through the trouble of sorting it in my head or yada yada.

    It took me a bit before I understood how this worked but once I "got it" it made total sense. I assume you want to start your month on the 15th because you want to spend/budget the check you get that day immediately. YNAB works differently though. In a perfect world, the paycheck you get March 15th doesn't even get touched till April. Between March 15th and April 1st you budget that money and decide how it will get spent. The money doesn't "exist" until April 1st though. You know exactly how much you have to budget for April because on March 15th you got April's money. April 15th you'll get May's money and repeat the process. The hard part is transitioning from spending the money as soon as you get it, to planning the money ahead of time and you can't plan it out if you don't know how much of it there will be. Until that check is in your hand the money just doesn't exist.

    YNAB works but you may have to change your process. I for one wouldn't change it especially considering it works so well.
    Joel
  • SuperboneSuperbone Posts: 1,389Member
    Let's change how many seconds are in a minute while we're at it. ;-)
    Joelenb
  • SynoviaSynovia Posts: 2Member
    I agree with the original poster here. Being able to set a "Fiscal Month" would make this drastically simpler for those of us who get payed in the middle of the month.

    People have offered a bunch of work-arounds (like splitting your income, etc), but they're all incredibly awkward until you have your 1-month buffer, and before you have that buffer is the most important time. YNAB assumes that when I get my paycheck on the 15th, that I should budget every dollar of it for the last 15 days of the month, when some percentage of that amount really should be budgeted for the 1-15th of the next month.

    For me, the calendar month is, from a fiscal perspective, meaningless.


    What I'm doing now is just subtracting 14 or 15 from any date for a transaction, so everything falls in the month the paycheck comes. IE, my April paycheck (on the 15th) is put in as April 1. My rent which is due on May 1, is put in as being on April 15th. Its a little more work, but its a whole lot less work than trying to pretend that calendar months are meaningful to me. If I could define the month as being from April 15th-May 14th, I would be able to enter things on accurate dates, and use the product properly.

    Also, this could be done without affecting the way the product works at all for people who get paid on the 1st.
  • JoelJoel Posts: 9,759Member, Beta Tester, Beta Moderator
    Synovia wrote:
    I agree with the original poster here. Being able to set a "Fiscal Month" would make this drastically simpler for those of us who get payed in the middle of the month.

    People have offered a bunch of work-arounds (like splitting your income, etc), but they're all incredibly awkward until you have your 1-month buffer, and before you have that buffer is the most important time. YNAB assumes that when I get my paycheck on the 15th, that I should budget every dollar of it for the last 15 days of the month, when some percentage of that amount really should be budgeted for the 1-15th of the next month.

    For me, the calendar month is, from a fiscal perspective, meaningless.


    What I'm doing now is just subtracting 14 or 15 from any date for a transaction, so everything falls in the month the paycheck comes. IE, my April paycheck (on the 15th) is put in as April 1. My rent which is due on May 1, is put in as being on April 15th. Its a little more work, but its a whole lot less work than trying to pretend that calendar months are meaningful to me. If I could define the month as being from April 15th-May 14th, I would be able to enter things on accurate dates, and use the product properly.

    Also, this could be done without affecting the way the product works at all for people who get paid on the 1st.

    When you receive income, you just budget it to categories that will need spending until you receive income again. Money stays in your category balances until it is spent. Leftover money in April, is automatically there in May. There is nothing complicated about this concept. You budget money when you receive it, and know that your category balances must last until you get paid again. It's really that simple.

    Your accounts should have balances and transactions that match reality. The dates for every transaction in your accounts are inaccurate. You should be more concerned about the category balances then whether or not your outflows can "beat" your budgeted amounts in a set month.

    Make spending decisions based on category balances! Regardless of how the budget periods are setup, once per year, once per month, once per paycheck, once per week, once per day. It does not matter! What matters is that you look at your category balances before spending money!
    tandiny
  • YYC27YYC27 Posts: 1,968Member, Beta Tester
    Synovia wrote:
    People have offered a bunch of work-arounds (like splitting your income, etc), but they're all incredibly awkward until you have your 1-month buffer, and before you have that buffer is the most important time. YNAB assumes that when I get my paycheck on the 15th, that I should budget every dollar of it for the last 15 days of the month, when some percentage of that amount really should be budgeted for the 1-15th of the next month.

    For me, the calendar month is, from a fiscal perspective, meaningless.
    Don't worry about splitting your income, etc. When you're paid on the 15th, budget all of that income. That will be your budget until you're paid again next month on the 15th. That's it. It's easy.
  • SynoviaSynovia Posts: 2Member
    Your accounts should have balances and transactions that match reality. The dates for every transaction in your accounts are inaccurate. You should be more concerned about the category balances then whether or not your outflows can "beat" your budgeted amounts in a set month.

    I can't both have transaction dates that are based on reality, and budget amounts that are based on reality. As I've explained, the system forces me to budget money for April that needs to be pushed into May. The carryover mechanism doesn't make intuitive sense when I'm not really crossing any sort of meaningful (for me) threshold.

    Yes, I can work around it as you've described, but it would be significantly simpler if the system allowed me to define realistic pay/budget period.


    Seriously, how would this change hurt you? Why are you so opposed to something that would clearly make the product more useful to alot of us, and not affect the rest of you at all?
  • WateryTartWateryTart Posts: 1,234Member
    These aren't "work arounds" - these are explanations of the way YNAB works.
  • JoelJoel Posts: 9,759Member, Beta Tester, Beta Moderator
    Synovia wrote:
    Your accounts should have balances and transactions that match reality. The dates for every transaction in your accounts are inaccurate. You should be more concerned about the category balances then whether or not your outflows can "beat" your budgeted amounts in a set month.

    I can't both have transaction dates that are based on reality, and budget amounts that are based on reality. As I've explained, the system forces me to budget money for April that needs to be pushed into May. The carryover mechanism doesn't make intuitive sense when I'm not really crossing any sort of meaningful (for me) threshold.

    Yes, I can work around it as you've described, but it would be significantly simpler if the system allowed me to define realistic pay/budget period.


    Seriously, how would this change hurt you? Why are you so opposed to something that would clearly make the product more useful to alot of us, and not affect the rest of you at all?

    You budget money when you receive it. You budget it to categories that need money until you receive income again.

    You should be looking at your category balances, and knowing that they must last until you receive income again.

    That's not a work around. That's reality. You receive money in April, and it has to last halfway through May. The calendar will always be that way. Do your bills all rearrange themselves based on your pay schedule because thats how you are paid? Or are your bills monthly, because the calendar has been set in stone for years.

    Your "Budgeted amounts" are meaningless. They are simply just a way to allocate your income into your category balances. The category balances are what matters.

    How does this change hurt me? It's very simple, YNAB has limited resources. The more time spent on features that add *nothing*, means the less time spent on features that add value. YNAB requires a change in mindset. Before YNAB, people use account balances and set their budgets based on numbers they expect to receive. Then they compare their original arbitrary numbers to what they spent, they may have won or lost on a few categories, and then they do the same thing next month. That doesn't help because often times your budget numbers are not realistic, and you don't account for the accumulation of wealth (or debt). With YNAB, the budget allocations are simply a means to put money into the categories. The important thing is to look at your category balances for spending decisions.

    It's really that simple. When you receive Income, budget it to the categories that you need to spend money on until you recieve income again. Then you look at your category balances to make spending decisions, keeping in mind that money has to last until you get paid again.

    If YNAB changed the calendar months as you suggest, the process would be exactly the same thing. You receive income, budget it out to categories until you receive money again. Then make spending decisions based on category balances. There is NO DIFFERENCE. The key is to realize your category balances must last until you get paid again. YNAB wants to break the paycheck-to-paycheck cycle. It forces you to make decisions about how you want to use your money. If you have $1, you can only purchase $1 worth of items. It's a limited supply and you must choose your priorities. Making this change would make it easier for users to STAY paycheck-to-paycheck. That's not the purpose of the software.

    Please just give it a chance. Date transactions properly. Budget income when you receive it, to categories that must last until you are paid again. Before spending money, look at your category balances and evaluate if its enough money to last until you get paid again. If there is, spend the money. It's really that simple!
    tandiny
  • wenchwench Posts: 46Member
    Synovia wrote:
    YNAB assumes that when I get my paycheck on the 15th, that I should budget every dollar of it for the last 15 days of the month, when some percentage of that amount really should be budgeted for the 1-15th of the next month.

    It really doesn't assume that. The income you receive on the 15th could be for a week, two weeks, a month, and YNAB wouldn't care, it is all just income.

    You know what needs to be budgeted during your next "fiscal month", so you can go ahead and put that into the categories now.
    At the end of the month, any money not yet spent will move neatly to the next month, and you can carry on, not bothered by the change of month.

    The money you put into your rent category today will sit there until you need it on May 1st, with no fudging of dates or other work around needed.
    Maybe it doesn't make sense to you conceptually now, but give it a try for a month, and see how you get on.
    tandiny
  • SuperboneSuperbone Posts: 1,389Member
    wench wrote:
    Synovia wrote:
    YNAB assumes that when I get my paycheck on the 15th, that I should budget every dollar of it for the last 15 days of the month, when some percentage of that amount really should be budgeted for the 1-15th of the next month.

    It really doesn't assume that. The income you receive on the 15th could be for a week, two weeks, a month, and YNAB wouldn't care, it is all just income.

    You know what needs to be budgeted during your next "fiscal month", so you can go ahead and put that into the categories now.
    At the end of the month, any money not yet spent will move neatly to the next month, and you can carry on, not bothered by the change of month.

    The money you put into your rent category today will sit there until you need it on May 1st, with no fudging of dates or other work around needed.
    Maybe it doesn't make sense to you conceptually now, but give it a try for a month, and see how you get on.

    What wench said. I've been paid bi-weekly forever and when I started YNAB, I was living paycheck to paycheck. It's really not an issue. Thanks to YNAB, I now have a buffer and it's that much easier.
    tandiny
  • blackdiamondblackdiamond Posts: 2,314Member, Beta Tester
    I will admit that I have always had a buffer, but I think because the budget screen in YNAB displays monthly too many people get wrapped around the axle. It its most simple version, the budget is an envelope system that retains money until it has been spent and it doesn't matter when money is put into them. The mobile app is nice because of really only shows one month and if you don't add or subtract from a category nothing changes.
  • SuperboneSuperbone Posts: 1,389Member
    I will admit that I have always had a buffer, but I think because the budget screen in YNAB displays monthly too many people get wrapped around the axle. It its most simple version, the budget is an envelope system that retains money until it has been spent and it doesn't matter when money is put into them. The mobile app is nice because of really only shows one month and if you don't add or subtract from a category nothing changes.

    Yeah, I think the number one thing it takes people a little time to wrap their brain around is you spend based on category balances and not account balances.
    tandiny
  • MakingLemonadeMakingLemonade Posts: 540Member
    YNAB runs on the calendar month, just like banks, just like companies, just like governments. You get a calendar from the mail or a store, & it runs Jan 1-Dec 31. Our world revolves around those dates, not Jan 15- Jan 14.

    We get paid both bi-weekly & a monthly commission & have no problem with YNAB the way it is. In fact, I wouldn't want it any other way. If our end of the month bi-weekly pay falls so that we have a week of one month & a week of the next month, no problem, I budget what I have to in the current month, then I head to the next month & budget my expenses until my next pay. It's quite simple & I think people are overthinking this. We don't have a buffer yet & will probably be quite awhile before we do, but YNAB is so comprehensive it doesn't matter.

    OP, if you haven't taken the free webinar's I highly recommend them. The teachers are awesome & so willing to help you understand the software & they answer your questions & show you how it works on their teaching software. It might help you grasp the concept better to see it done in a class. :)
    Intelytics
  • RoloRolo Posts: 297Member
    I appreciate the replies and words of advice. However, in terms of simplicity having the option to set a budget month based on your payday is easier than doing what others have suggested.I would like to see the outflows based on each payment period and not based on calendar month, and I would like outflows to better match the amount budgeted. It makes things easier to understand and I wouldn't have to go through the trouble of sorting it in my head or yada yada.
    Actually, you already have what you want and your case isn't any different than everyone else who does not have just one payday on the first of every month (most people do not); the fourth rule ("live on last month's income") is why.

    Does the date your income is deposited really matter? Using rule #4, 15 March paycheck is really April's income so that you know precisely how much income you have for that month; 15 April's paycheck is May's income. You are still budgeting for that pay period; you just happen to have your deposit ~15 days early (I get my pay on the last day of the month; I'm not going to call my month 30 April-31 May; I'm just going to use May). Additionally, my wife gets paid every Friday, so what is her (along with everyone who gets paid weekly/bi-weekly) "fiscal month" supposed to be? Her paychecks in April are actually May's income, regardless of what day/date they get deposited.

    I don't see any benefit (or difference) to creating a "fiscal month" centred around your paydate and I like YNAB's simple, straightforward, hot-rod design (it gets you to where you want to go very quickly without any extra weight). I didn't ditch Quicken only to wind up back to it.

    brookville-32ford.jpg
  • toronto_guytoronto_guy Posts: 120Member
    I had similar concerns this month when I realized that my last bi-weekly pay of the month would fall 6 days before the end of the month (not fully buffered yet). I didn't want to pick a new start date for the month or anything, but I was wondering how best to handle splitting needed funds between late April and early May. Then I realized that it doesn't really matter. I simply enter the income, and assign the funds where they are needed until I get paid again. Nothing could be easier.
  • BidimusBidimus Posts: 62Member
    I think I get the "problem" now. Let me see if I have this straight. The perception is if I get a paycheck in the middle of the month, let's say the 15th of April for $1000. And for simplicity I have one category called "Spending Money". The feeling is that one needs to budget half of the $1000 for April and the other half for May. This would result in a $500 budget balance for April and $500 for May. Then in May you repeat the process and split it between May and June so that on May 15 the category has $1000 budgeted and June has $500 (assuming you didn't spend anything).

    This really isn't necessary though. Assuming you still don't have a buffer yet, what should happen is this. April 15 you budget $1000 into your "Spending Money" category. Let's assume you spend $900 a month in this category and by May 1 you've spent $450 because only half a month has passed when the next month started. As of May 1 you'll have $550 in that budget category balance for the month. By May 15 that balance will have almost have run out but you'll have a new pay check and can add $1000 to that category at that point.

    As you can see, the specific date of the pay check doesn't have any barring on ensuring the budget category has sufficient funds at the appropriate times. Eventually you'll have a buffer built up and instead of putting it's dollars into budget categories for the current month, you'll put them in categories for the next month. The current month will already have sufficient budget balances to cover all of the current months expenses.

    In the mean time, things stay simple and I think that's really the key to the success of this system. Every time I've tried to budget in the past, things get so complicated trying to work out expected expenses and their dates against expected income that it always ended up failing. Personally I'm approaching month 5 and things keep looking just a little bit better. I'm projecting a year out before I have any real stability, but it's coming and I can see it reflected in the numbers. :)
  • IntelyticsIntelytics Posts: 7Member
    edited July 2013
    Did you guys all have a rough day at work or something? Or go you get paid by YNAB for every post that you spam with unjustified reasons why coding development shouldn't be done? I'm guessing some of both in here. 

    The only post that was helpful and accommodating was this one:
    INAB26 said
    I get where you're coming from. I started YNAB 3 years ago having used a very fancy spreadsheet budget that I'd carefully customized to run from the 15th to the 15th of each month. I too was skeptical that I would be able to use YNAB. I will say this though...my spreadsheet budget never worked. We kept overspending and never got ahead. YNAB does. Follow the 4 rules and try to be open to thinking about some things a little differently. I can almost promise that you won't regret it.
    Yes, you can make YNAB work just fine while being paid on the 15th. All you have to do is learn a some unnecessary juggling, and your good to go. I say unnecessary because if he could change his month start to the 15th, his learning curve would be much shorter, and there would be no reduction in the quality of the YNAB financial style!  There really is zero material financial benefit in forcing someone to start on the 1st. For example, if you took an expert YNAB budgeter and told them they had to switch to a calendar that started on the 15th, they would modify their values in a few minutes, and there would be zero new savings, or lost money. No change. Both budgets would follow the same rules, and would perform the exact same. At the end of the year, that budgeter would have the same amount of money. 
    ** This means that we are dragging new users through a steeper learning curve to avoid a relatively small amount of coding change.

    A side note to a bully here for trying to make him feel stupid:
    AliciaB said:
    YNAB runs on the calendar month, just like banks, just like companies, just like governments. You get a calendar from the mail or a store, & it runs Jan 1-Dec 31. Our world revolves around those dates, not Jan 15- Jan 14.
    I don't know what companies or governments you talk to, but I've never met one, ever, that uses calendar months. Almost every major corporation in existence uses a fiscal calendar to manage their finances. Learn about them here before degrading a fellow user. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiscal_year  What if my small business runs on a fiscal year? If I live a financial calendar for 8 hours a day, why cant my 1 hour a week on YNAB match it as well?  No-one cares about what your world revolves around, and the calendar you found at Wal-Mart. What matters to BudgetGuy812 is what HIS world revolves around.  I almost never look at a 'normal' calendar in my life. So why can't I have my fiscal calendar in my YNAB, and why can't he have his 15th? We will all keep doing the same YNAB process, and nothing else will change.

    My point is... Please don't spam users with nonsense ideas and fake arguments, Try to be helpful! 

    Post edited by Intelytics on
    NevadaBob
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